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Author:  All I can say is
E-mail:  not available
Date:  10/6/2004 9:45:00 AM
Subject:  WOW!!
Message:  A PREVIOUS POST:

Dear Rabbi,

If a non-Shabbat observant Jew poured himself a glass of non-mevushal wine, would he drinking treif?
Would his bracha be levatel?

Cheers,
Martin

    
Reply: Why would he care? Why would you care? Who cares? He obviously doesn't believe in Hashem. His Brachos are to who? I'm lost.
CYA

I'm not sure why Martin asked this question but I was shocked by your answer! A non-Shabbat observing Jew doesn't believe in Hashem??!? WOW! What a statement!

I assume you realize that some (many?) (most?) readers of this site are not 100% frum (is anyone really 100% anyway??)

Would you suggest that all other mitzvot don't matter to anyone who happpens to drive, cook, or work on Shabbat? Should I not eat in my sukkah tonight because last Shabbat I lit candles after zman?

I've always appreciated your no nonsense answers but I think this one goes overboard.

I assume that I won't hear back from you before tonight, so I'll eat in my sukkah, dance with a torah tomorrow night, get an aliyah on Friday and enjoy Shabbat. If you happen to read this and think that I'm wasting my time doing those things, please tell me because I have playoff tickets that I'm otherwise giving up. Maybe I can go to the game. I hear the treif hot dogs are good.

   
Reply:  Although my name is Aaron, my brother is not necessarily Moses.

Moses brought us the Torah from God. My brother was just repeating what the Law says.

If you will look in Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah #158, you will see that it is more severe than even suggested by my brother. Then you can look at the laws of Aveilut (Mourning) of a person in that level of non-observance (Yoreh Deah #345:5), and you will see the severity in relation to a relative's requirements for mourning when such a person passes on.

Your example of lighting candles after the Zman is not the same as a person who "doesn't keep Shabbat." I think you understand that. If a person sincerely believes in God, then he/she would do as God says. People who do not believe in God do as they please. If a person tries to do what is required, but has setbacks, that does not put him/her in this category. If a person is on their way back to God, then they should certainly take whatever Mitzvot they can do, and keep on trucking.

But as you suggest "that all other mitzvot don't matter to anyone who happpens to drive, cook, or work on Shabbat? Should I not eat in my sukkah tonight because last Shabbat I lit candles after zman?........I'm wasting my time doing those things, please tell me because I have playoff tickets that I'm otherwise giving up. Maybe I can go to the game. I hear the treif hot dogs are good."

Good question! I don't believe you meant what you said, but that statement proves my brother's point. Just a little Shabbat desecration was important enough to you, that if this is unacceptable to God, then to heck with the whole thing. Is that based on a belief in God?

Many of us actually need a little work on our belief in God. If we knew that every second God is right there watching us, would we ever sin at aLL?

Now, God wants only one thing. See Yechezkel Perek #18. God says, "Do I want the death of a Rasha (sinner)? says God, No, just that he returns from his sins and lives." (loose translation)

God wants us to come back to him and follow his laws. We look around at the hypocrisies that we see amongst some so-called religious Jews, and we use that as an excuse to not be a part of "that." God is not responsible for them. God gave each one of us a choice between right & wrong. If they choose wrong in their warped way, does that give us a right to choose wrong too?

Life is relatively simple. We know there is a God. He gave us Laws. We follow them and that's all there is to it.

Chag Sameach!
AA

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